Climate of Doubt As Superstorm Sandy Crosses US Coast

Picture NOAA National Hurricane Center shows Sandy as it approaches the eastern seaboard of the United States

A 30-YEAR-OLD man has just become the first New Yorker to be killed by the destructive force of the super-charged storm Sandy which, as I type, is moving across the eastern side of the United States.

The New York Times reported how the man died when a tree fell on his house in Queens. The former-Hurricane Sandy has already claimed more than 60 lives in Caribbean countries.

There are something like 50 million Americans currently in the storm’s path. It seems inevitable that more people will lose their lives in the coming hours.

Whatever transpires we no doubt all hope that the number of fatalities is low. But neither good fortune nor any god will decide. The death toll will be what it is, and families will grieve.

It seems insensitive to mention the billions of dollars of damage the storm will cause. Not just to federal properties but also most likely homes as well. Some damages may be minor, but if the storm brings a lot of rain into certain areas then it can be certain that Water and Mold Remediation Services may have their work cut out with people potentially needing assistance to repair their homes from extensive water damage.

However, it goes without saying that those damages would affect the lives of numerous people. For instance, homes will be ravaged by the storm which would probably lead homeowners to look for house restoring and mending services like roof replacement (which can be availed by contacting an expert like Winston Salem roofing contractor), electrical assistance, and much more. Though it might, to some people, seem insensitive to mention human-caused climate change at a time like this, it is necessary.

But given that neither Mitt Romney nor Barack Obama had the courage, the foresight, or the necessary leadership qualities to be able to mention the issue in their official debates, I’d say their insensitivity is far greater than any which a freelance journo and blogger across the Pacific may be able to muster.

But the evidence would suggest that it is reckless to ignore the hand which burning coal (some of it Australia’s), oil and gas and tearing down forests has had on this storm and is having on extreme weather events across the world.

Adding billions of tonnes of additional greenhouse gases into the atmosphere each year is loading the climate dice. When you roll the dice, the chances of getting extremes such as droughts, heatwaves and floods increase. Continue reading “Climate of Doubt As Superstorm Sandy Crosses US Coast”

Share